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14
UPLOADS


Media Type
14
images
Year
5
2010
1
1954
1
1952
1
1951
1
1947
1
1946
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Topics & Subjects
1
Where -- Glenn Research Center GRC
1
Where -- Hamilton
1
Who -- Chuck Yeager
Collection
Creator
14
naca
9,234
nasa
168
nasa/bill ingalls
139
nasa/carla cioffi
105
nasa ames research center
40
nasa/paul e. alers
13
nasa/jsc
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NASA Images
by NACA
image
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Amelia Earhart front row, center on the steps of Langley Research Building in 1928 before a tour. Legend has it that, during the tour, part of her raccoon fur coat was sucked into a high speed wind tunnel. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery5.html
NASA Images
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In 1954, the fifth and final of the NACA's Colliers was awarded to Richard Travis Whitcomb of Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the development of the Whitcomb area rule—a ''powerful, simple, and useful method of reducing greatly the sharp increase in wing drag heretofore associated with transonic flight, and which constituted a major factor requiring great reserves of power to attain supersonic speeds.'' Here Whitcomb is shown in the 8-foot High-Speed Tunnel in April 1955...
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1954.html
NASA Images
by NACA
image
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Kitty Joyner, an electrical engineer for the NACA, at work in 1952. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery2.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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The historical evolution of airfoil sections from 1908-1944. The last two shapes are low-drag sections designed to have laminar, uninterrupted flow over 60 to 70 percent of chord on both the upper and lower surfaces. The NACA airfoils subsequently influenced the design of every modern aircraft wing. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery4.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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Many of Langley Laboratory's early experiments focused on ways to reduce aircraft drag. One method was to place a cowling or covering over the engine cylinder heads, much like the hood over the engine of a car. By the end of September 1928, wind tunnel tests of cowling #10 showed a dramatic reduction in drag. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery8.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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A semispan airplane model and flow-direction vane mounted on the wing of a P-51D airplane for transonic tests by wing-flow method. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery6.html
NASA Images
image
eye 158
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In 1947, the Collier Trophy was awarded to John Stack of Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for research to determine the physical laws affecting supersonic flight. Lawrence D. Bell and Chuck Yeager also shared in this trophy for their work on supersonic flight. This image is of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Who -- Chuck Yeager
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1947.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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Twin jet exhausts are inclined toward the ground to simulate takeoff conditions for certain engine installations and to identify options for decreasing takeoff distances. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery3.html
NASA Images
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In 1929, President Herbert Hoover presented the Collier Trophy to Joseph Ames, chairman of the NACA, for the development of low-drag cowling for radial air-cooled aircraft engines. The Collier has been awarded annually since 1911 by the National Aeronautic Association ''for the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles.'' Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1929.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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Among the famous visitors to NACA facilities: Fred E. Weick, head of the Propeller Research Tunnel section from 1925-1929, in the rear cockpit; aviator Charles Lindbergh, in front cockpit; and Tom Hamilton, aviator and eventual aircraft/airport manufacturer, standing. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Where -- Hamilton
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery7.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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The NACA's seal. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery9.html
NASA Images
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In 1946, the Collier Trophy was awarded to Lewis A. Rodert of Ames Aeronautical Laboratory for the development of an efficient wing deicing system. This Consolidated B-24 Liberator (pictured) was modified by the NACA for studies on the effects of inflight icing on all aerosurfaces such as the wings, tail, engine cowling, nose, props and antenna. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1946.html
NASA Images
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In 1951, the Collier Trophy was awarded again to John Stack and associates at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the development and use of the slotted-throat wind tunnel. Stack, head of Compressibility Research Division, was a hard-charging man whose attitude toward unproven technology was usually, ''Let's try the damn thing and see if we can make it work.'' Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1951.html
NASA Images
by NACA
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This analog computing machine—a very early version of the modern computer—was located in the Fuel Systems Building at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland now the John H. Glenn Research Center. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Where -- Glenn Research Center GRC
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery10.html